?CASINOS RELATED WITH MEYER LANSKY IN THE HAVANA OF THE FIFTIES?

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Gallery Image


Despite the veal of discretion covering the development of games of chance in town and the long time elapsed since then, there’s no doubt that Meyer Lansky was the axis of the American mafia’s penetration in such productive business during the late period of the republican Cuba. He remained a guest in the country since halfway though the 50’s, when gambling associated to tourism reached a rapid peak boosted by the support of Fulgencio Batista’s government. Lansky was the main organizer of the big casinos that appeared in the city of Havana, bringing the essential capital and advice. About his life and work during this period there are several books, newspaper articles, movies, etc. Therefore, it wouldn’t be useful to devote space to repeat such a discussed and described matter. However, given his well-known contribution to setting and operating casinos located in Havana’s luxury hotels Capri, National, and Riviera, we have decided to use this factor in order to shape this page, the protagonist of which will be the chips issued by these centres.
As it fallows, let’s see a brief summary of the history and characteristics of each of them:


The casino of the National Hotel:

The National Hotel of Cuba was considered the best in the Caribbean and the third largest in the country by the late 1950’s, with 549 rooms, its entrance located on the intersection of M and 21 streets, in Vedado, over a superb high point providing a view over Havana’s seafront. It was built on the grounds where once was the Santa Clara Battery at a cost of four million pesos by the "Pan American Airways Company", by means of a concession the Cuban government granted in exchange for the presidential suite where visiting heads of state stayed. Inaugurated on December 30th 1930, for decades it remained the country’s biggest and finest until Riviera and Havana Hilton hotels came into service.

Since it was the country’s emblematic hotel, hundreds of world class figures stayed there, from presidents to celebrities. However, one of the parties that most contributed to its fame was the one who stayed in between December 22nd through the 26th 1946. Over five hundred people, among which capos, counsellors, bodyguards, lawyers, etc., members or associates of the most powerful families of the American mafia, booked the entire facility to discuss their areas of influence and their plans of expansion. The famous meeting occurred given the presence in town of Lucky Luciano whose excuse was an alleged tribute to his friend Frank Sinatra for his great artistic success at the moment. Sinatra had come to Havana accompanied by Joe, the younger Fishetti brother and cousin of Al Capone, to sing for such exclusive audience, and was welcomed with great excitement by the national press. Two interesting photos of his meeting with journalists in the hotel can be found in our gallery.

In December 1958, 80% of the hotel was property of the “Intercontinental Hotel Corporation”, from Delaware, United States. This was a subsidiary of “Panamerican World Airways Inc.", one of the six subsidiary companies based in Cuba under the control of John D. Rockefeller’s group. The remaining 20% was Cuban capitals represented by Alejandro Suero Falla, general manager of seven sugar factories, who was its president until November 21st 1957, José M. Bosch, president of “Bacardi Rum Company Inc.”, and José M. Tarafa Govin, member of the wealthy Tarafa family, which owned several sugar factories. Its president was Warren Pine, manager of “Pan American” in Cuba, and William Land was the managing director. This company was constituted in August 1955, and rented the hotel a few days later for the cost of $3 600 000.

Shortly after, still in 1955, a constructive remodelling began on one of the sides of the hotel (the one on the left that faced the ocean) which, by means of a wonderful architectural solution that didn’t clash with the building’s classic lines, added a harmonious complex accessible through a luxurious ramp from one of the entrance avenues. The complex had bars, restaurants, a cabaret that even competed with Tropicana by offering the best shows in the Caribbean (The Parisien), and a room specifically designed to house a casino.

By that time, Meyer Lansky had showed some interest for the gambling business in Cuba with a small participation in the casino of the Montmartre cabaret, one of the few that remained operating in Cuba at the moment, and that began to introduce “fair gambling” as opposed to other centres in town like Sans-Souci and Tropicana, notorious for cheating that had led to numerous complaints by tourists ending up in a police raid after which several American gangsters were expelled from the island.

The complex was sublet by Lansky, who paid a substantial sum to the hotel, and already in the winter of 1955 had set up and a superb casino known either as International Casino or Wilbur Clark’s (someone with a great reputation within the gambling world) whom he brought from Vegas specifically to promote the place. He appointed his brother Jake (beetle-browed Lansky) as a manager. Jake made sure to operate within the strictest norms of security and supervision in order to guarantee a fair professional game, which was a matter of vital importance to boost the activity in a country constantly accused of being corrupt in the tourist circles.

About Lansky’s connexions with President Batista at that time, a lot has been said. We can’t offer evidence, but it’s very true that it was in 1955 when 2074 Decree-law was passed granting licenses to create casinos in all tourist facilities with an investment of one million pesos. Other steps were taken to help these centres by tax exemptions that allowed equipment such as tables, roulettes, slot machines, etc. to be imported without paying custom taxes. Regulations became more flexible when it came to give dealers and other figures from the gambling circle visas for years with no problem whatsoever.

That is to say, at the time, gambling was openly allowed and the centre was even properly registered and had its binding operation license. Therefore, its chips were ordered in the United States clearly identified by Wilbur Clark’s name and even with his picture. This is a rather unprecedented factor in the Cuban collection and quite unusual in general, making them very desirable for collectors. As to those with no value that only had the name and letters corresponding to roulette tables embossed, they are generally found quite worn out and illegible, because the casino operated for more than four years.

All in all, this was a pioneer among casinos located in big hotels, which were soon everywhere. It had seven roulette tables, three card tables, one for dice games, and 21 slot machines. Like all centres of its kind, it operated in collaboration with a luxurious cabaret that was the main source to attract the costumers needed, in this case the adjoining Parisien Cabaret.

During the events of January 1st 1959, being located in such a respectable hotel like the National, it was unharmed. However, even though it was among the casinos allowed to operate in March, it didn’t stay open for long, because its owner soon left the country.


The casino of Capri hotel:

The Capri Hotel, built at a cost of 5.5 million dollars by Jaime Canaves Llull, owner and manager of "Constructora Jaime Canaves, Compañía" (Jaime Canaves’ Building Company), was inaugurated on December 10th 1957. It was leased to the American company “Sheppard Hotels Inc.”, that would operate it for 20 years, and the president of which was J. J. Sheppard, owner of Ponce de León and Leamington hotels, both in Miami.

Located on a strategic and high position, on the corner of N and 21 in Vedado, just one block away from National Hotel, three from the Hilton, and practically in the centre of the so-called Rampa, main commercial and amusement area in Havana, it had all that was needed for a bright future.

Its casino was located on one of the building’s wings, with independent access next door to the hotel’s entrance, and a superb neon sign on its façade. It was the only casino located in a hotel that had such independence. It is even said that the fact that designers gave it such dimensions and importance was detrimental to the hotel’s image, that actually had a very small and poorly conceived front door not in line with the building’s elegance.

The facility had two rooms, one on the front that functioned as a cabaret and ball room, traditionally called Salón Rojo by Cubans, and an adjoining one sumptuously fit out with carpets, several huge lamps, slot machines, especial tables to play cards and dice, and six roulette tables, organized in a circle around a central one for the general supervisor, according to the latest norms for such places.

Although every one knew Meyer Lansky was the true owner and organizer, the casino was officially ran by Santos Traficante Jr., member of the New York’s mafia who had been prosecuted for the murder of Albert Anastasia in New York in 1957. Traficante was considered the king of bolita in Tampa. He also operated the casinos of the Comodoro Hotel and the Sans Souci Cabaret, and his second man in Cuba was Joseph Silesi, aka Joe Rivers.

Another important element in this centre’s history was the presence of the charismatic actor George Raft, famous not only as an artist but also because of his connexions with the mafia. From the very beginning, Raft appeared as the casino’s daily host. His presence attracted a great deal of Hollywood celebrities who would make short trips on weekends to enjoy first-class gambling and the wonderful shows this place had to offer. This was maybe the reason to issue the famous 5 peso chip with the actor’s image that he would give as a present to the most outstanding guests as an encouragement and advertising mechanism.

Its chips were ordered from the Burt Company in the United States, and their manufacture was of high quality. Two series with value are known. The regular series with chips worth 1, 5, 25, and 100 pesos, and the so-called “small island series” with chips worth 1, 5, 25 pesos, plus a 100 peso chip that reads “credit”. As to the tables, these were named by the letters A, B, C, D, E, F, and each one had the traditional colours of chips with no value: red, blue, yellow, cream, and brown, and dark brown chips with a value of 5 pesos.

This was one of the few casinos granted authorization to reopen after the triumph of the Revolution, but it faced the same problem as the others, making more loss than profits. Therefore, it was soon dismantled.

Its chips are the most common ones in the Cuban collection. This derives from the amount of chips it issued and from the fact that between its bankruptcy halfway through the 60’s and the nationalization of casinos in late 1961 it was turned into a luxury cabaret. Therefore, all the equipment, chips included, were within reach of the several brigades working in the remodelling, and ended up in private hands.


The casino of the Riviera hotel:

Riviera was the most splendid big hotel finished in Cuba during the 50’s, and the second largest after Habana Hilton. It was 21-story-high, had 368 rooms, and was located on the very seafront of Havana, at the end of Paseo Avenue.

The inauguration took place on December 10th 1957, and among those present there was Cardinal Arteaga, who blessed it, the Vice-president of the Republic Guas Inclan, Justo Luis del Pozo, the mayor of Havana, and several ministers of the government. Around one hundred Americans joined them, many of which were members of the Mob and Hollywood celebrities like Ginger Rogers, Lou Costello, etc. The event was widely spread in the United States by the Steve Allen Show, of great television rating, and several publications of the epoch.

The architectural project was the work of “Feldman Construction Corporation” from Miami, authorized in Cuba by the architect Manuel Carrera Machado. The owners were foreign capitals representing the Sicilian-American mafia and officials in Batista’s government. The total capital amounted to 4 millions pesos subscribed by 23 shareholders, mainly Americans.

Its casino was the most luxurious in Cuba. It was located on the right side of the wide lobby, in an enormous room designed specifically for that purpose.

The manager was Edward G. Levingston, who was a member of the firm’s board of directors, but everyone knew that it belonged and had been conceived by Meyer Lansky, who considered it the most precious jewel of his rising Cuban collection.

To operate the many installations in the casino, Lansky sought the help of a group of American dealers with experience in gambling like Frank Erickson, Giordino Cellini, and Dusty Peters, whose presence brought the casino a reputation of being the most professional in Havana. In addition, it was the biggest and most luxurious, with 85 slot machines, and over 20 tables for different games. However, the everlasting question about this casino is the little variety of chips in its collection. We’ve only encountered 4 different values in the numerous lots that have appeared in the market, and the series of chips with no value and of several colours that was always prepared for the roulette tables is not known.


Details of the sample

In the case of the images that constitute this page’s galleries there is the following relation between their codes and the topics they deal with:

A – E: The chips of the Wilbur Clark’s Casino.

F – J: The chips of the Capri’s Casino.

K: The chips of the Riviera Casino.

Following the chips we include, as usual, several images of pictures, postcards, advertisements, equipment, furniture and fittings, etc., related to these casinos and the figures that ran or frequented them. The list of these images is the following:

No. -- Description -- Color

A-01 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value, “Set of the portrait”, Wilbur Clark’s Casino, Havana Cuba. -- Beige

A-02 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip value 1 Peso, “Set of the portrait”, Wilbur Clark’s Casino, Havana Cuba. -- Yellow/blue

A-03 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip value 5 Pesos, “Set of the portrait”, Wilbur Clark’s Casino, Havana Cuba. -- Red/blue

A-04 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip value 25 Pesos, “Set of the portrait”, Wilbur Clark’s Casino, Havana Cuba. -- Blue/red

A-05 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip value 100 Pesos, “Set of the portrait”, Wilbur Clark’s Casino, Havana Cuba. -- Black/red

    

B-01 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value, Set “Wilbur Clark Habana printed in the center”. -- Beige

B-02 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value, Set “Wilbur Clark Habana printed in the center”. -- Yellow

B-03 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value, Set “Wilbur Clark Habana printed in the center”. -- Red

B-04 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value, Set “Wilbur Clark Habana printed in the center”. -- Blue

B-05 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value, Set “Wilbur Clark Habana printed in the center”. -- Light brown

    

C-01 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value, Set “Wilbur Clark Habana”. -- Brown

C-03 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip value 5 Pesos Table B, Set “Wilbur Clark Habana”. -- Brown

C-04 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip value 5 Pesos Table C, Set “Wilbur Clark Habana”. -- Brown

C-05 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip value 5 Pesos Table D, Set “Wilbur Clark Habana”. -- Brown

C-06 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip value 5 Pesos Table E, Set “Wilbur Clark Habana”. -- Brown

C-07 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip value 25 Pesos Table D, Set “Wilbur Clark Habana”. -- Olive green

C-08 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip value 25 Pesos Table E, Set “Wilbur Clark Habana”. -- Olive green

    

D-01 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table A, Set “Wilbur Clark Habana”. -- Beige

D-02 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table B, Set “Wilbur Clark Habana”. -- Beige

D-03 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table C, Set “Wilbur Clark Habana”. -- Beige

D-04 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table D, Set “Wilbur Clark Habana”. -- Beige

D-05 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table E, Set “Wilbur Clark Habana”. -- Beige

D-06 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table A, Set “Wilbur Clark Habana”. -- Yellow

D-07 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table B, Set “Wilbur Clark Habana”. -- Yellow

D-08 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table C, Set “Wilbur Clark Habana”. -- Yellow

D-09 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table D, Set “Wilbur Clark Habana”. -- Yellow

D-10 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table E, Set “Wilbur Clark Habana”. -- Yellow

D-11 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table A, Set “Wilbur Clark Habana”. -- Rojo

D-12 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table B, Set “Wilbur Clark Habana”. -- Red

D-13 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table C, Set “Wilbur Clark Habana”. -- Red

D-14 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table D, Set “Wilbur Clark Habana”. -- Red

D-15 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table E, Set “Wilbur Clark Habana”. -- Red

D-16 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table A, Set “Wilbur Clark Habana”. -- Blue

D-17 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table B, Set “Wilbur Clark Habana”. -- Blue

D-20 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table D, Set “Wilbur Clark Habana”. -- Blue

D-21 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table A, Set “Wilbur Clark Habana”. -- Brown

D-22 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table B, Set “Wilbur Clark Habana”. -- Brown

    

E-01 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip value 0.5 “Set N. H.” -- Light brown

    

F-01 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip value 1 Peso, Set “Casino de Capri”. -- Blue/beige

F-02 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip value 1 Peso, Set “Casino de Capri”. -- Orange/blue

F-03 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip value 5 Pesos, Set “Casino de Capri”. -- Red/yellow

F-04 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip value 25 Pesos, Set “Casino de Capri”. -- Verde/rojo

F-05 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip value 100 Pesos, Set “Casino de Capri”. -- Black/violet

F-11 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip value 1 Peso, Set “Capri Casino with image of the island”. -- Beige/red

F-12 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip value 5 Pesos, Set “Capri Casino with image of the island”. -- Orange/yellow

F-13 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip value 25 Pesos, Set “Capri Casino with image of the island”. -- Blue/beige

F-14 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip value 100 Pesos, Set “Capri Casino with image of the island”. -- Beige

    

G-01 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip value 5 Pesos Table A, Set “Casino de Capri”. -- Brown

G-02 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip value 5 Pesos Table B, Set “Casino de Capri”. -- Brown

G-03 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip value 5 Pesos Table C, Set “Casino de Capri”. -- Brown

G-04 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip value 5 Pesos Table D, Set “Casino de Capri”. -- Brown

G-05 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip value 5 Pesos Table E, Set “Casino de Capri”. -- Brown

G-06 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip value 5 Pesos Table F, Set “Casino de Capri”. -- Brown

    

H-01 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table A, Set “Casino de Capri”. -- Beige

H-02 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table B, Set “Casino de Capri”. -- Beige

H-03 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table C, Set “Casino de Capri”. -- Beige

H-04 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table D, Set “Casino de Capri”. -- Beige

H-05 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table E, Set “Casino de Capri”. -- Beige

H-06 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table F, Set “Casino de Capri”. -- Beige

H-07 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table A, Set “Casino de Capri”. -- Yellow

H-08 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table B, Set “Casino de Capri”. -- Yellow

H-09 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table C, Set “Casino de Capri”. -- Yellow

H-10 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table D, Set “Casino de Capri”. -- Yellow

H-11 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table E, Set “Casino de Capri”. -- Yellow

H-12 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table F, Set “Casino de Capri”. -- Yellow

H-13 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table A, Set “Casino de Capri”. -- Rojo

H-14 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table B, Set “Casino de Capri”. -- Red

H-15 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table C, Set “Casino de Capri”. -- Red

H-16 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table D, Set “Casino de Capri”. -- Red

H-17 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table E, Set “Casino de Capri”. -- Red

H-18 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table F, Set “Casino de Capri”. -- Red

H-19 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table A, Set “Casino de Capri”. -- Blue

H-20 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table B, Set “Casino de Capri”. -- Blue

H-21 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table C, Set “Casino de Capri”. -- Blue

H-22 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table D, Set “Casino de Capri”. -- Blue

H-23 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table E, Set “Casino de Capri”. -- Blue

H-24 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table F, Set “Casino de Capri”. -- Blue

H-25 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table A, Set “Casino de Capri”. -- Brown

H-26 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table B, Set “Casino de Capri”. -- Brown

H-27 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table C, Set “Casino de Capri”. -- Brown

H-28 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table D, Set “Casino de Capri”. -- Brown

H-29 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table E, Set “Casino de Capri”. -- Brown

H-30 -- Obverse ídem reverse: chip without value Table F, Set “Casino de Capri”. -- Brown

    

I-01 -- Obverse: chip value 5 Pesos. Set “Casino de Capri with portrait of George Raft” -- Red

I-01r -- Reverse: chip value 5 Pesos. Set  “Casino de Capri with portrait of George Raft” -- Red

    

J-01 -- Obverse idem reverse: chip without value, Set “Capri”. -- Blue

    

K-01 -- Obverse idem reverse: chip without value, Set “Havana Riviera”. -- Gray/blue

K-02 -- Obverse idem reverse: chip without value, Set “Havana Riviera”. -- Orange/black

K-03 -- Obverse idem reverse: chip value 1 Peso, Set “Havana Riviera”. -- Yellow/red

K-04 -- Obverse idem reverse: chip value 5 Pesos, Set “Havana Riviera”. -- Red/blue

K-05 -- Obverse idem reverse: chip value 25 Pesos, Set “Havana Riviera”. -- Green/yellow

K-06 -- Obverse idem reverse: chip value 100 Pesos, Set “Havana Riviera”. -- Black/beige

    

L-01 -- Obverse idem reverse: chip value 5 Pesos, given as a sample in a propaganda brochure -- Blue

    

M-01 -- Wilbur Clark at the door of the Casino Internacional  

M-02 -- Wilbur Clark at the door of the Casino with the director of the “Show” magazine  

M-03 -- Wilbur Clark working at a roulette table  

M-04 -- The gambling machines of the Casino Internacional – “Cabaret” magazine of December 1956  

M-05 -- Sailors gaming in the roulette of the Casino Internacional – “Cabaret” magazine of December 1956  

M-06 -- American guests in the Casino Internacional – “Cabaret” magazine of December 1956  

M-07 -- Wilbur Clark’s Casino Internacional - Propaganda in the 1958 Guía Social de La Habana   

M-08 -- Wilbur Clark’s Casino Internacional - Propaganda in the 1958 “Cuba of Tourism” magazine  

M-09 -- Hotel Nacional and Mike McLaney’s Casino – Propaganda in the 1959 Guía Social de La Habana   

M-11 -- Wilbur Clark’s Casino Internacional – Front cover of a propaganda booklet  

M-12 -- Wilbur Clark’s Casino Internacional – Page of a propaganda booklet  

M-13 -- Wilbur Clark’s Casino Internacional – Page of a propaganda booklet  

M-14 -- Wilbur Clark’s Casino Internacional – Page of a propaganda booklet  

M-15 -- Propaganda of the Parisien Club in the “Show” magazine of March 1959  

M-16 -- Propaganda caricature signed by Massaguer – “Chauffeur” magazine  

M-17 -- Wilbur clark’s Casino Internacional – Welcome to delegates of the N.B.A.  

M-18 -- Mike Mc Laney’s Casino - Propaganda in the 1959 Directorio Social de La Habana   

M-19 -- Cover for photos of the Mike Mc Laney’s Casino  

M-20 -- Image of the casino published in the “O Cruzeiro” magazine of August 1958.  

M-21 -- View of a crowd in behalf of the opening of the Casino Parisien on January 1958.  

M-22 -- Article about an incident with Mike Mc Laney in the Havana airport.  

    

N-01 -- Wilbur Clark’s Casino Internacional, Havana, Cuba – Post card  

N-02 -- Hotel Nacional de Cuba – Post card  

N-03 -- Hotel Nacional, Habana, Cuba – Post card  

N-04 -- Hotel Nacional, Habana, Cuba – Photo  

N-05 -- The inside of the Wilbur Clark’s Casino Internacional – In a propaganda leaflet  

    

P-01 -- Frank Sinatra in the Hotel Nacional in 1946 – Unpublished photo  

P-02 -- Frank Sinatra signing autographs in the Hotel Nacional in 1946 – Unpublished photo  

P-03 -- Photo of Wilbur Clark in the 1950s  

    

Q-01 -- Die used in the casino with the name of Wilbur Clark  

    

R-01 -- Article about the Hotel and Casino Capri in the “Bohemia” magazine of February 16, 1958  

R-02 -- George Raft and his presence in Cuba – Article in the “Bohemia” magazine  

R-03 -- Casino de Capri - propaganda in the 1959 Directorio Social de La Habana   

R-04 -- George Raft invites you to the fabulous Casino de Capri – Propaganda in the 1959 Guia Social de La Habana   

R-05 -- Souvenir Gaming Guide, Casino de Capri – Front cover  

R-06 -- Souvenir Gaming Guide, Casino de Capri – Back cover  

R-07 -- Souvenir Gaming Guide, Casino de Capri – Inner page  

R-08 -- Souvenir Gaming Guide, Casino de Capri – Inner page  

R-09 -- Souvenir Gaming Guide, Casino de Capri – Inner page  

R-10 -- George Raft invites you to the subjugating Casino de Capri -  Propaganda pamphlet  

R-11 -- George Raft presents the show “Cuba and Mexico” – Reverse of the previous pamphlet  

R-12 -- Casino de Capri – Propaganda in the 1960 Phone Book  

R-13 -- Article about the Casino de Capri – “Show” magazine   

R-14  -- Article about George Raft – Newspaper “Revolución” of Monday, January 12, 1959  

    

S-01 -- The inside of the Casino de Capri – Post card  

S-02 -- The entrance of the Casino de Capri – Post card  

S-03 -- The inside of the Red Saloon of the Capri – Post card  

S-04 -- George Raft invites you to the subjugating Casino de Capri – Glass holder  

S-05 -- Portrait of George Raft – Reverse of the previous glass holder  

    

T-01 -- George Raft – Photo of his actor’s times.  

T-02 -- George Raft at his arrival to the city of Havana - Photo   

T-03 -- George Raft on the bench of the Almendares baseball team – Photo   

    

V-01 -- Souvenir Gaming Guide, Havana Riviera Casino – Front cover  

V-02 -- Souvenir Gaming Guide Havana Riviera Casino – Back cover  

V-03 -- Souvenir Gaming Guide, Havana Riviera Casino – Inner page  

V-04 -- Souvenir Gaming Guide, Havana Riviera Casino – Inner page  

V-05 -- Havana Riviera Casino – Front cover of a propaganda booklet  

V-06 -- Havana Riviera Casino – Page of a propaganda booklet  

V-07 -- Havana Riviera Copa Room and Casino - Propaganda in the1959 Directorio Social de La Habana   

V-08 -- Outside part of the propaganda booklet “Havana in the grand manner”  

V-09 -- Inside part of the propaganda booklet “Havana in the grand manner”  

V-10 -- Detail of the former image (the casino)  

V-11 -- Detail of the former image (people gaming in the casino)  

    

W-01 -- Hotel Havana Riviera – Post card  

W-02 -- Airplanes over the Malecon in front of the Hotel Havana Riviera – Unpublished photo  

    

X-01 -- Hotel Casino Riviera – Article in the “Bohemia” magazine  of February 16, 1958  

X-02 -- Article about the opening of the Hotel Riviera – “Bohemia” magazine of December 1957  

X-03 --  Article about discrimination in the Casino Riviera – “Confidencial” magazine of December 1957  

X-04 --  Page of the newspaper “Prensa Libre” with propaganda about the casino.  

    

Y-01 -- Havana Riviera, Hotel, Cabaña Club and Casino – Propaganda in the cover of a match box  

Y-02 -- Havana Riviera – Dice used in the Casino.